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<DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2134px"><NOBR>How does anyone establish a <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> or domicile? The law requires two steps: first, </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2155px"><NOBR>the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2175px"><NOBR>American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2196px"><NOBR>married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2217px"><NOBR>state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2237px"><NOBR>duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2258px"><NOBR>duty. Understanding this two-pronged <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2299px"><NOBR>How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2320px"><NOBR>important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-<B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> document to execute </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2341px"><NOBR>or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B>, my home state, where I understand one must </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2362px"><NOBR>eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B> by heart.) Rather, to </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2382px"><NOBR>establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 0px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2551px"> <HR> <TABLE width="100%" border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD align=right bgColor=#eeeeee><FONT face=arial,sans-serif><A name=3><B>Page 3</B></A></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 14px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 449px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2606px"><NOBR>-3- </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2660px"><NOBR>what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2680px"><NOBR>are listed below: </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2721px"><NOBR>Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2744px"><NOBR>persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2764px"><NOBR>Registering to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> in Florida </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2786px"><NOBR>by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000 </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2807px"><NOBR>presidential election.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2827px"><NOBR>Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2850px"><NOBR>denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2870px"><NOBR>by another state.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2890px"><NOBR>Registering a vehicle and paying <I>ad valorem</I> personal property tax on the vehicle (For more </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2913px"><NOBR>regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> assistance Website at </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times color=#0000ff size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; COLOR: #0000ff; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2934px"><NOBR><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm">http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm</A><FONT face=Times color=#000000><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm"> </A>and choose the link to </FONT></NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2954px"><NOBR>Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2974px"><NOBR>Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2997px"><NOBR>member's state of <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3018px"><NOBR>without meeting the two-part <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is not sufficient if ever challenged.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3038px"><NOBR>Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3061px"><NOBR>purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B>.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3081px"><NOBR>Enlistment and re-enlistment documents </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3103px"><NOBR>Location of bank accounts </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3124px"><NOBR>Participation in local affairs </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3147px"><NOBR>Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3169px"><NOBR>professional association) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3189px"><NOBR>Business connections </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3211px"><NOBR>Location of majority of family members </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3255px"><NOBR>In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3275px"><NOBR>was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3296px"><NOBR>determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3317px"><NOBR>Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3337px"><NOBR>to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B>, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3358px"><NOBR>as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3379px"><NOBR>inconvenient. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3420px"><NOBR>For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance located at </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3441px"><NOBR>521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3462px"><NOBR>retirees in <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> matters. The office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3482px"><NOBR>Wednesday and Friday. The office is open 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays. You can reach </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3503px"><NOBR>the office at (301) 619-2221.</NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2134px"><NOBR>How does anyone establish a <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> or domicile? The law requires two steps: first, </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2155px"><NOBR>the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2175px"><NOBR>American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2196px"><NOBR>married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2217px"><NOBR>state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2237px"><NOBR>duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2258px"><NOBR>duty. Understanding this two-pronged <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2299px"><NOBR>How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2320px"><NOBR>important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-<B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> document to execute </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2341px"><NOBR>or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B>, my home state, where I understand one must </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2362px"><NOBR>eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B> by heart.) Rather, to </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2382px"><NOBR>establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 0px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2551px"> <HR> <TABLE width="100%" border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD align=right bgColor=#eeeeee><FONT face=arial,sans-serif><A name=3><B>Page 3</B></A></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 14px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 449px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2606px"><NOBR>-3- </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2660px"><NOBR>what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2680px"><NOBR>are listed below: </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2721px"><NOBR>Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2744px"><NOBR>persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2764px"><NOBR>Registering to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> in Florida </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2786px"><NOBR>by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000 </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2807px"><NOBR>presidential election.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2827px"><NOBR>Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2850px"><NOBR>denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2870px"><NOBR>by another state.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2890px"><NOBR>Registering a vehicle and paying <I>ad valorem</I> personal property tax on the vehicle (For more </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2913px"><NOBR>regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> assistance Website at </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times color=#0000ff size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; COLOR: #0000ff; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2934px"><NOBR><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm">http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm</A><FONT face=Times color=#000000><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm"> </A>and choose the link to </FONT></NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2954px"><NOBR>Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2974px"><NOBR>Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2997px"><NOBR>member's state of <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3018px"><NOBR>without meeting the two-part <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is not sufficient if ever challenged.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3038px"><NOBR>Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3061px"><NOBR>purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B>.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3081px"><NOBR>Enlistment and re-enlistment documents </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3103px"><NOBR>Location of bank accounts </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3124px"><NOBR>Participation in local affairs </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3147px"><NOBR>Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3169px"><NOBR>professional association) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3189px"><NOBR>Business connections </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3211px"><NOBR>Location of majority of family members </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3255px"><NOBR>In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3275px"><NOBR>was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3296px"><NOBR>determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3317px"><NOBR>Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3337px"><NOBR>to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B>, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3358px"><NOBR>as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3379px"><NOBR>inconvenient. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3420px"><NOBR>For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance located at </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3441px"><NOBR>521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3462px"><NOBR>retirees in <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> matters. The office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3482px"><NOBR>Wednesday and Friday. The office is open 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays. You can reach </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3503px"><NOBR>the office at (301) 619-2221.</NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2134px"><NOBR>How does anyone establish a <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> or domicile? The law requires two steps: first, </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2155px"><NOBR>the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2175px"><NOBR>American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2196px"><NOBR>married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2217px"><NOBR>state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2237px"><NOBR>duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2258px"><NOBR>duty. Understanding this two-pronged <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2299px"><NOBR>How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2320px"><NOBR>important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-<B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> document to execute </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2341px"><NOBR>or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B>, my home state, where I understand one must </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2362px"><NOBR>eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of <B><SPAN class=goohl0>Texas</SPAN></B> by heart.) Rather, to </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2382px"><NOBR>establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 0px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2551px"> <HR> <TABLE width="100%" border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TD align=right bgColor=#eeeeee><FONT face=arial,sans-serif><A name=3><B>Page 3</B></A></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 14px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 449px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2606px"><NOBR>-3- </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2660px"><NOBR>what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2680px"><NOBR>are listed below: </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2721px"><NOBR>Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2744px"><NOBR>persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2764px"><NOBR>Registering to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B> in Florida </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2786px"><NOBR>by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000 </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2807px"><NOBR>presidential election.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2827px"><NOBR>Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2850px"><NOBR>denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2870px"><NOBR>by another state.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2890px"><NOBR>Registering a vehicle and paying <I>ad valorem</I> personal property tax on the vehicle (For more </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2913px"><NOBR>regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> assistance Website at </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times color=#0000ff size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; COLOR: #0000ff; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2934px"><NOBR><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm">http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm</A><FONT face=Times color=#000000><A href="http://www.detrick.army.mil/detrick/usag/sps/sja/assistance.cfm"> </A>and choose the link to </FONT></NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT><FONT face=Times size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16px; FONT-FAMILY: Times"> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2954px"><NOBR>Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2974px"><NOBR>Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 2997px"><NOBR>member's state of <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3018px"><NOBR>without meeting the two-part <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal</SPAN></B> test is not sufficient if ever challenged.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3038px"><NOBR>Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3061px"><NOBR>purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new <B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B>.) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3081px"><NOBR>Enlistment and re-enlistment documents </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3103px"><NOBR>Location of bank accounts </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3124px"><NOBR>Participation in local affairs </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3147px"><NOBR>Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 135px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3169px"><NOBR>professional association) </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3189px"><NOBR>Business connections </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3211px"><NOBR>Location of majority of family members </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3255px"><NOBR>In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3275px"><NOBR>was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of <B><SPAN class=goohl1>legal </SPAN></B><B><SPAN class=goohl2>residence</SPAN></B> is </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3296px"><NOBR>determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3317px"><NOBR>Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3337px"><NOBR>to <B><SPAN class=goohl3>vote</SPAN></B>, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3358px"><NOBR>as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3379px"><NOBR>inconvenient. </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 162px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3420px"><NOBR>For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance located at </NOBR></DIV> <DIV style="LEFT: 108px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 3441px"><NOBR>521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick <B><SPAN class=goohl1>Legal</SPAN></B> Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and </NOBR></DIV></SPAN></FONT></SPAN></FONT></SPAN></FONT></DIV>

How does anyone establish a legal residence or domicile? The law requires two steps: first,
the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a
American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting
married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that
state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active
duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active
duty. Understanding this two-pronged legal test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent.
How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is
important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-legal document to execute
or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in Texas, my home state, where I understand one must
eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of Texas by heart.) Rather, to
establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see
-3-
what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent
are listed below:
Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a
persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.)
Registering to vote and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to vote in Florida
by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000
presidential election.)
Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have
denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued
by another state.)
Registering a vehicle and paying ad valorem personal property tax on the vehicle (For more
regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the legal assistance Website at
Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.)
Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service
member's state of residence for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form
without meeting the two-part legal test is not sufficient if ever challenged.)
Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the
purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new residence.)
Enlistment and re-enlistment documents
Location of bank accounts
Participation in local affairs
Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or
professional association)
Business connections
Location of majority of family members
In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member
was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of legal residence is
determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home.
Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering
to vote, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep
as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often
inconvenient.
For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick Legal Assistance located at
521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick Legal Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and
retirees in legal matters. The office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday and Friday. The office is open 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays. You can reach
the office at (301) 619-2221.
How does anyone establish a legal residence or domicile? The law requires two steps: first,
the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a
American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting
married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that
state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active
duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active
duty. Understanding this two-pronged legal test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent.
How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is
important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-legal document to execute
or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in Texas, my home state, where I understand one must
eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of Texas by heart.) Rather, to
establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see
-3-
what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent
are listed below:
Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a
persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.)
Registering to vote and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to vote in Florida
by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000
presidential election.)
Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have
denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued
by another state.)
Registering a vehicle and paying ad valorem personal property tax on the vehicle (For more
regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the legal assistance Website at
Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.)
Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service
member's state of residence for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form
without meeting the two-part legal test is not sufficient if ever challenged.)
Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the
purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new residence.)
Enlistment and re-enlistment documents
Location of bank accounts
Participation in local affairs
Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or
professional association)
Business connections
Location of majority of family members
In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member
was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of legal residence is
determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home.
Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering
to vote, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep
as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often
inconvenient.
For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick Legal Assistance located at
521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick Legal Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and
retirees in legal matters. The office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday and Friday. The office is open 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays. You can reach
the office at (301) 619-2221.
How does anyone establish a legal residence or domicile? The law requires two steps: first,
the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a
American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting
married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that
state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active
duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active
duty. Understanding this two-pronged legal test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent.
How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is
important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-legal document to execute
or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in Texas, my home state, where I understand one must
eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of Texas by heart.) Rather, to
establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see
-3-
what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent
are listed below:
Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a
persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.)
Registering to vote and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to vote in Florida
by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000
presidential election.)
Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have
denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued
by another state.)
Registering a vehicle and paying ad valorem personal property tax on the vehicle (For more
regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the legal assistance Website at
Maryland Motor Vehicle Laws.)
Filing a DD Form 2058 (A Department of Defense form filed with DFAS stating the service
member's state of residence for income tax withholding purposes. Simply signing this form
without meeting the two-part legal test is not sufficient if ever challenged.)
Purchasing a real estate (Service members who buy a home should be prepared to prove the
purchase was not accompanied by the intent to make that state their new residence.)
Enlistment and re-enlistment documents
Location of bank accounts
Participation in local affairs
Membership in the local chapter of a national organization (such as a college fraternity or
professional association)
Business connections
Location of majority of family members
In summary, a service members home of record describes the state where the member
was living when he or she entered the military. A service members state of legal residence is
determined by a physical presence and the intent to make that state his or her permanent home.
Intent is demonstrated by many actions, chief of which include paying income taxes, registering
to vote, and obtaining a drivers license. To withstand a challenge, service members should keep
as many of the above eggs in one basket as practical despite the fact doing so is often
inconvenient.
For assistance with specific questions, visit the Fort Detrick Legal Assistance located at
521 Fraim Street. The Fort Detrick Legal Assistance Office helps soldiers, family members, and
retirees in legal matters. The office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Wednesday and Friday. The office is open 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays. You can reach
the office at (301) 619-2221.
How does anyone establish a legal residence or domicile? The law requires two steps: first, the persons physical presence in the state (flying over the state sipping tomato juice on a American Airlines flight will not suffice, but visiting in-laws for the first time after getting married will); and secondly, the persons desire (or intent) to be a permanent "citizen" of that state. Look again at the definition above. For members of the armed forces serving on active duty, this second step includes the intent to return to a state after being discharged from active duty. Understanding this two-pronged legal test is easy. The hard part is proving your intent. How does anyone prove a fixed intent to remain in or return to a particular state? First, it is important to understand that there is no one particular form or super-legal document to execute or a special ceremony to attend. (Except in Texas, my home state, where I understand one must eat eight jalapeno peppers in one sitting and recite The Eyes of Texas by heart.) Rather, to establish intent government agencies (and college financial aid departments) will look to see what a person has done to demonstrate this intent. The most common actions that prove intent are listed below: Payment of state income taxes (Courts have considered this most important because of a persons willingness to put his money where his intent is.) Registering to vote and voting record (A member of the armed forces right to vote in Florida by absentee ballot while serving outside the state received national attention in the 2000 presidential election.) Application for a driver's license (Financial aid offices at colleges and universities have denied in-state tuition to a dependant solely because the sponsors drivers license was issued by another state.) Registering a vehicle and paying ad valorem personal property tax on the vehicle (For more regarding drivers licenses and vehicle registration rules, visit the legal assistance Website.